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Modifications to the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Continuum by Hedgerows – Observations from a field site in Northern England

Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, EGU2016-8469, EGU General Assembly 2016

Abstract

UK farming practices have changed significantly over the past 100 years. This is evident in arable fields, where the use of larger machinery has led to the removal of hedgerows. In the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK this has led to a doubling in field size since 1892. The national-wide change is responsible for longer slope lengths, increased runoff velocities and greater potential for connectivity, which may be responsible for an increase in flood risk at the catchment scale. However there is a lack of physical evidence to support this theory. Hedgerows are a widespread, man-made boundary feature in the rural UK landscape. They play an important ecological role in providing shelter, changing the local climate, reducing erosion and have a strong influence on local soil properties. Their impact on hydrology has not been widely studied but it is hypothesised that their presence could alter soil moisture levels and the soil structure, therefore affecting runoff.

Author(s): Coates, V, Pattison, I

Journal: Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, EGU2016-8469, EGU General Assembly 2016

Year: 2016

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